Africa and the evolution of Big Ideas

Taruvinga Magwiroto At some point in the history of man, there have come along some great ideas and theories with powerful explanatory capabilities. Ideas like capitalism; democracy; Marxism and its variants; modernisation; theory of evolution…the list goes on. Ideas are important because they provide the edifice upon which the practical world works.  One obvious thing that these ideas have is that they originated from the … Continue reading Africa and the evolution of Big Ideas

Mugabe, in Jacob Zuma’s words.

Taruvinga Magwiroto Well, I will describe him as one of our heroes who has been in the struggle from a young age…I don’t think he knew any other thing except the struggle Jacob Zuma on Robert Mugabe on SABC. As a writer, I consider myself to be a special witness. This, I believe, gives me the right to tell stories, particularly the African story. So … Continue reading Mugabe, in Jacob Zuma’s words.

South Africa and the Burning Boy: crises and the quest for good governance

Taruvinga Magwiroto Watching the agonising and soul-wrenching spectacle of a young man being burnt alive in South Africa, to the atavistic howls of a patently blood thirsty crowd got me seriously thinking. Not about the horrors that young man must have felt as the life was cruelly squeezed out of his burning lungs. Not the literal “up in flames” of dreams of the good life … Continue reading South Africa and the Burning Boy: crises and the quest for good governance

Zimbabwe: Making sense of the issues and staking the future Part 1.

Taruvinga Magwiroto One of the attractive-sounding ideas that I have is that “to dream the future look at what worked in the past”. But looking at what worked in the past will not suffice if we don’t ask a crucial additional question: why? So the full question becomes: “what worked in the past and why?” This is particularly important in the Zimbabwean case because what … Continue reading Zimbabwe: Making sense of the issues and staking the future Part 1.

A False Start: The Agric Education Years

Taruvinga Magwiroto Whether it was fate unfolding, or just sheer bad luck, it’s up to you to decide. So at the end of 2005, after the Binga bunga bunga, the Msambakaruma incidences and Magunje escapades, I was ready to call time to my days in the field. I was joining the Agricultural Education Department as a lecturer, excited to become a proper “Sir!”  I had … Continue reading A False Start: The Agric Education Years

Re-building Zimbabwe’s agriculture: Between a rock and a hard place.

Taruvinga Magwiroto One of the foundational premises that should anchor any development plans for Zimbabwe and other developing countries is the centrality of land as the primary economic resource. Indeed, this fact is recognised in Zimbabwe. That, ostensibly, is why the land reform programme was launched in the first place. Fundamentally, it was about re-distribution of the national cake, broadly speaking. However, no sooner was … Continue reading Re-building Zimbabwe’s agriculture: Between a rock and a hard place.

Reflections and musings on my trip to The Fens.

The 20 August 2019 trip was probably the best of all my Marshal Papworth trips. Maybe it is because now I have a better grasp of what I was doing the whole of last year. Maybe it’s because now I know more of what I want to be doing in future. Maybe it was the fact that, for once, as fate would have it, the … Continue reading Reflections and musings on my trip to The Fens.

The future of agriculture in Zimbabwe: science of common sense

Taruvinga L. Magwiroto According to estimates by the World Food Programme, 5.5 million Zimbabweans will need food aid this year. This is a result of drought and related weather calamities. But in large measure, this is an indictment of our agriculture system. From a food and nutrition security, we have stagnated, nay, degenerated since the land reform programme. Those with pieces of land but not … Continue reading The future of agriculture in Zimbabwe: science of common sense